Am I still a mother?

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After the ectopic I obviously struggled with grief, and the question ‘Am I still a mother?’

My DH had a better time with it. In his eyes it wasn’t a baby yet, and I completely get that. I was only about 7 weeks along (I think).  We had no ultrasound picture. We heard no heartbeat.  The baby would only have been about the size of a pea, which is why we called it our little pea.

As a woman, the one to physically go through all the pain, the one to pee on a stick and see the double lines, the one to feel pregnant, I can’t dismiss it all so easily.

I was torn between feeling like I shouldn’t be as upset because of the facts mentioned above, and feeling like utter hell. I didn’t have that long to get attached. But I also didn’t need that long.  I didn’t consider myself a mother. I had not given birth in my opinion. I wondered if anyone in my situation did think of themselves as a mother. I wondered if I should? If I had the ‘right’ to.

I stumbled upon the above quote and I have to say, I agree. It makes me tear up to read it. I may not have given birth, heard a heart beat, or had an ultrasound picture. But damnit I – we – created a baby. So yes. I am a mother. I won’t celebrate on Mother’s Day. I will grieve on that day each year.

As I mentioned before, it took me a while to come to the realization that I even wanted kids. But the turmoil of losing one proved just how much I do want one. Two actually if it’s in the cards for me. To be able to celebrate on Mother’s Day.

First pregnant ob visit.

Everyone in the Obgyn office was so excited for me after my second test of the day revealed a bun in the oven. The pelvic exam looked normal. My uterus was growing as expected. There were so many smiles and congratulations. But my ob was cautious as there was a possibility of ectopic pregnancy. The spotting and cramping were a cause for concern for all of us. Probably not ectopic, but we better do an ultrasound to be sure.

In all the movies and tv shows I’ve seen an ultrasound is simple. Cold gel on the abdomen and a device gliding on top. A smiling tech explains everything to you and all is well. You go on about your day with a print of your jelly bean in hand, and smile plastered on your glowing face.

First of all, I was unaware that your bladder needed to be full to the point of bursting in order to get a good ultrasound. You’ve seen these just popped water balloon photos right? Yeah.
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The gel was freezing, the room was dark, the tech barely spoke English and refused to say anything descriptive. We were not able to look at the screen.

Then she brought out a wand with a magnum condom on it. You know where that went. Highly uncomfortable. But at least she let me go release the water balloon pressure first.

After more silence she got her superior who reviewed the images and proceeded to tell us they couldn’t see anything and that they were sorry. They slowly backed out of the room like they thought I would burst into tears or lunge angrily at them. Truth is, I knew it was too early anyways. Turns out my hcg (the ‘pregnancy’ hormone that appears in your blood and then in urine and gives you a positive test result) was only at 1300 and you won’t see anything on an ultrasound until it hits 1500. I was still hopeful.

As I mentioned in the last post I was off to California. In the airport almost boarding my plane a nurse from my ob office called. Due to the ultrasound test alone she concluded that I was miscarrying. Hello misinformation! I specifically asked her if she could be wrong and of course, there was no way she was wrong.

I was obviously upset. But I had a nagging feeling she was wrong. I did some online research and discovered that it was definitely too early to see anything and continued just enjoying being pregnant. Hubby and me with our little pea got to walk in the Pacific Ocean for the first time-all together. I think our time in Cali was the only time I was able to really absorb and relish being pregnant. 🙂

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Next chapter: Coming home, being a human pin cushion, going to the emergency room.

Hello!

Hi cyberverse! I’m not big on small talk so let’s cut to the chase shall we? This year I went through getting pregnant with an ectopic pregnancy, having the tube rupture, having surgery, and starting to heal. It was my first and so far only pregnancy. With lots of drama and emotions in between.

I have found a surprising lack of info, support, and discussion about this common occurrence. Especially in the USA. The last I read, 1 in 50 pregnancies is ectopic. Something like 1 in 5 pregnancies will end. (Ectopic, miscarriage, still birth etc).

Until this year I had never even heard the term “ectopic pregnancy”.

Oh sure in health class in school we took how to make a baby 101 and learned that an std would kill you or drive you insane. But the word ectopic never came up.

Ectopic pregnancy is the number 1 cause of death in the first trimester.

I’m starting this blog for several reasons. Not in any specific order: 1) I love to write. Writing is therapeutic for me. Given that I went through a trauma I figured this would help. 2) To raise awareness of the serious and common danger of ectopic pregnancies. 3) To let others who have been through this and worse know that they are in fact not alone. 4) If I can make even one person feel better or comfort them in any way then I will be happy.

I’m trying to put my story out there with as much detail as I can. For those of us going through this when researching online the devil is in the details. I’ll try to be thorough. If I leave things out I will edit later. I’m always editing in my life. I’ll try to cut it up into more easily digestible chunks for you. It may take some time before I’m caught up with where I am right now. I honestly can’t wait until it’s all out and back to the present tense.

Also, for convenience sake I’m writing most of these on my phone. Autocorrect sucks. Please excuse the random if instead of of and whatever else slips through.

Happy reading! Thank you for stopping by!